In 2014 a host of places missed out on the incredible experience of being a part of Le Grand Depart, which started in Yorkshire, including this part of the North Yorkshire Moors…

Now, Bridlington, Scarborough and many seaside towns and villages along the way are “gearing up” to make the most of this huge inaugural event.

The media have already claimed it to be the biggest and most exciting cycling event in the UK for 2015 and with all eyes on Bridlington for the start – it’s being shown live on TV across the UK and Europe – there is a lot of pressure for Yorkshire to impress.

Of course, the region already received rave reviews for its opening part in Tour de France Grand Depart 2014 and won the opportunity to feature in Heathrow Airport’s digital advertising campaigns that year (the North East won the opportunity for 2015) [Source: The Northern Echo].

It has already been named the second most picturesque county in England [Source: The Yorkshire Post] and is due to showcase some of the lesser known parts across all three stages of the event.

On May 1st, the race starts at Bridlington and travels through the following towns and villages before finishing on Scarborough’s sea front:

  • Bridlington
  • Hunmanby
  • Dalby Forest
  • Pickering
  • Danby
  • Grosmont
  • Robin Hood’s Bay
  • Flamborough
  • East Ayton
  • Thornton le Dale
  • Rosedale Abbey
  • Glaisdale
  • Whitby
  • Scarborough

Andy Wilson, chief executive of the North York Moors National Park Authority, told the Yorkshire Evening Post: “We’re delighted and very excited that the inaugural Tour de Yorkshire is taking in such a large part of the North York Moors National Park. The route will provide the cyclists and the watching global public with many of our ‘must sees’ including ancient woodland, rolling moorland, picture-postcard villages and stunning heritage coast.

“The North York Moors has carved out a well-deserved reputation as being a fantastic place for mountain biking; the Tour de Yorkshire will highlight to the world that our quiet lanes and fantastic views make it a top destination for road cyclists, too.”

The first stage of the race will include a climb out of Robin Hood’s Bay, which is 1.5km long and has an average gradient of 10.3%.

  • If you’re a keen cyclist or fan of the sport, we encourage you to keep up to date with all of the goings on via our official Stanley Travel Bike Bus subsidiary, on Facebook and Twitter, @UKBikeBus.
  • If you were one of the lucky people to cheer on last year’s antics, feel free to share your photography and videos with us at @stanley_travel on Twitter.

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